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  • Faithful to my Homeland, the Republic of Poland
  • NEWS

  • 7 June 2019

    “The months to come will be critical when it comes to strategic decisions on the EU’s policy and efforts to ensure prosperity and security of its citizens. We view the process of selecting candidates for top EU jobs through this prism,” Deputy Minister Konrad Szymański said during his meeting with Matthijs van der Plas, the Director General for European Cooperation at the Dutch MFA.

    The agenda of the consultations included taking stock of the Sibiu Summit, the new Strategic Agenda, including transparency, internal market, security, climate, the EU’s external relations, the rule of law and migrations, Brexit, enlargement policy and the situation of Polish workers on the Dutch labour market.

     

    Poland and the Netherlands are among the states that favour enhancing integration in the service sector. In this context, Deputy Minister Szymański emphasized that in the era of a growing global competition and strained international trade relations, it should be one of the EU’s top strategic priorities to further develop the single market. “The single market is the cornerstone of Europe’s prosperity and competitiveness,” said the Polish deputy minister. "I believe that a strong voice of states that have similar views on the matter may help this process,” he added.

     

    The ministers also discussed the situation of Polish workers on the Dutch labour market. Deputy Minister Szymański welcomed several articles published recently in the Dutch press, which give an extensive and objective coverage of problems that temporary workers face on the Dutch labour market, including illegal actions of local employment agencies. “The Polish and Dutch authorities still need to engage in an open dialogue on the Dutch policy of combating the exploitation and abuse of Polish employees,” said the Polish deputy MFA head.

     

    The Dutch labour market has a significant share of temporary jobs and a strong position of employment agencies. This poses an increased risk for employees. Migrant workers are particularly vulnerable, including a 200,000-strong group of Polish temporary employees working in the Netherlands.

     

    MFA Press Office

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